The Internet Escort’s Handbook

Safe, Sane, Successful Escort Work is Possible!

World AIDS Day

December 1 is World AIDS Day. It’s not a moment to celebrate, but rather a moment for reflection. For years I thought the focus on AIDS was excessive. I began researching right before I became an escort and even more so during the writing of Book 1: The Foundation. The disease is terrible and worth every bit of attention it brings. At the moment, the only real weapons we have are prevention and education. Women and AIDS Because of the sexual physiology of women, we’re always at a higher risk for sexually-transmitted HIV/AIDS than men during heterosexual sex. Although there are great new medicines that allow someone with AIDS to live a longer, more productive life; not everyone has access to these drugs. Not getting becoming infected is better than having to worry about your health-care access. An article on AIDS in the December 2006 Glamour (page 166) reports that experts estimate 250,000 people in the U.S. currently have AIDS but don’t know it [italics mine]. Women’s rate of infection is rising and make up 27 percent of new infections in the U.S. (infection rates differ from country to country). U.S. Escorts and AIDS Although the article didn’t discuss the issue of sex work, it’s highly probably that there are some escorts who are infected and don’t know it. A working escort with AIDS faces serious legal issues, puts all her sexual partners at risk, and jeopardizes her own future. Getting tested is the only way to know for sure what’s going on in your body. After testing comes education. Learning about the real risks and real effects of...

More on the HPV Vaccine

The November 2006 issue of Glamour (page 114) has a short Q&A about the newly-released HPV vaccine, the vaccine that will prevent HPV-caused cervical cancer. I’ve summarized it here since I could not find the entire article online (I feel this is important information to be shared). Two basic facts about HPV HPV stands for human papillomavirus, the virus that causes genital warts. The CDC reports that 80% of all women will contract this virus before they’re 50. There are over 100 different strains of this virus. A few can cause cervical cancer, a few cause genital warts. I don’t know what, if any, effects the other strains have. About the vaccine According to Glamour, the current vaccine blocks the two strains that cause the majority of cervical cancer, along with two strains that cause genital warts. A vaccine scheduled for approval in 2007 could offer better cancer protection but no protection against warts. The vaccine is recommended for women ages 11-26. Since the idea of the vaccine is prevention (it is not a cure), younger women who may not have been exposed to the virus will benefit most. Sexually active women in their late 20s are assumed to have been exposed to the virus already, in which case prevention by proper condom usage and detection through regular Pap smears are recommended. But feel free to ask your doctor about the vaccine even if you’re 27 or older. There are exceptions to every rule. Even if you get the vaccine, this doesn’t mean you can skip condom usage or regular Pap smears. The vaccine protects against the two strains...

Get Tested for Bacterial Vaginosis

In a short piece from page 110 of the May 2003 Glamour, women are advised to ask their gynecologist to test for bacterial vaginosis (BV) with every visit. Half the women with BV don’t have symptoms. Left untreated it can lead to pelvic inflammatory disease and cause premature delivery if you’re pregnant. The article recommended the POCkit BV quadro, an in-office test covered by most insurance plans that has a 98 percent accuracy rate. (my comments below) BV is treatable with a short dose of antibiotics. But you can never be immune, which is why it’s important to be tested every time you go in for an exam. BV is not a disease, per se; it’s an imbalance in the natural yeast and bacteria within the vagina. Sexual activity is generally blamed for the infections, but some women are more prone to these imbalances than others. Douching can also cause BV (by creating an imbalance within the vagina), and there are other possible causes that aren’t yet pinpointed. For more information on BV, read the CDC page. One book that explores BV (and other problems) in-depth is The V Book by Elizabeth G. Stewart and Paula...

Walking and Your Heart Rate

Although I discuss appearance in-depth in the first book (The Foundation), I don’t harangue escorts on dieting or working out. Being healthy and presenting a polished appearance is far more important to your happiness and attracting good clients. But for those who may want a simple idea for working out, here are a few tips. You probably already know the state of your health and body. A realistic assessment with a mirror and a flight of stairs will tell you if you’re in good condition, need to lose weight or improve your aerobic function. If you decide you want to shed some weight or improve your aerobic capacity, then more physical activity is a must. A simple way to do this is by walking. It works for European women. It will work for you too. But if your life doesn’t allow you to spend all day walking from place to place, you’ll need to hit the gym. For your activity to be effective, you must sustain your target heart rate for 30 minutes (or more), anywhere from 3-6 times a week. This means you’ll spend 10-15 minutes warming up and reaching your target heart rate, at least 30 minutes sustaining it, plus another 15 minutes or so to properly cool down and stretch. (I said walking was a simple way to exercise, not a fast way!) Reaching your target heart rate is very important because that’s what really burns calories while strengthening your heart and lungs. Walking for 45 minutes a day won’t build a whole lot of muscle, although you will become toned. Lifting weights for 45 minutes...