The Internet Escort’s Handbook

Safe, Sane, Successful Escort Work is Possible!

Field Testing: Having Sex on Your Period

Warning: if you’re put off by very frank discussion of the female body and its functions, you should probably stop reading right now. I’m going to talk about menstrual cycles in a non-titillating manner. In Book 1 I outline several methods of dealing with your period while working. I hadn’t tried them all when I wrote that section. Since then, I have. I’ve been off birth control pills for the past year and my periods have resumed their normal, very-heavy tendencies. Besides not working on my heavy days, I’ve tried some different methods. I have to. As always, being on my period guarantees lots of appointment-requests. I still haven’t figured out why that happens. Obviously this post is for those who aren’t taking birth control that completely stops menstruation. Instead Cups I still love my Instead Cups. The offer the best options. For light days, they’re perfect on their own. On heavy days I still put something absorbent inside the cup before inserting them. A low-to-medium absorbency tampon can work, or a small, natural sea sponge. It’s very important to remember you’re using backup and make sure you remove it when you remove the cup. Leaving it inside will cause an infection. If you’re having sex with someone well-endowed, they could cause the cup to leak, with or without the absorbent materials inside. Not much you can do about that. Know your body, know your clients and try to work around your period if you and/or your clients really don’t want leakage. I discuss using the cups a bit more in Book 1. Natural Sea Sponges The have been...

Fight Syphilis With Marriage

It’s not a comforting thought or one that medical science would agree with. Apparently Hitler believed it, enough that it became one of his plans. He also felt marriage would help fight prostitution. Little does he know! Yet another example of how power-crazed rulers don’t understand sex or humanity. (Hitler was off the deep end more than most, but Bush has gotten into the marriage game too, though for different reasons than...

The Odds of Sexually-Transmitted Infections

According to Self, August 2006 (page 190), your lifetime chance of contracting a sexually-transmitted disease* is greater than one in two. The article discussed condom usage and herpes (which condoms don’t always protect against). It did not discuss what the writer defined as an STD. For example, many health-care professionals consider bacterial vaginosis to be an STD because only sexually active women get it. However, it’s not a strictly a disease but an imbalance in your vagina brought on by sexual activity. The article’s statistic is alarming. I looked online to try and find confirmation of it and could not, yet the various articles I did find were not much more encouraging. In general, it seems that if you indulge in sexually-risky activity, your chances of contracting an STD are better than your chances of winning a hand in a Vegas casino. The best way not to become a statistic is to reduce your risks as much as possible – strict condom usage, no intravenous-drug use, minimal number of sexual partners, no other body-fluid swapping. If you decide to go without condoms for all sexual activities, your likely odds are stated above. Always using condoms for sexual activity lowers your risks significantly. (This article did not specify if regular condom usage would alter the reported statistic, but I’m guessing it would.) I’m not trying to gloom and doom you. Not at all. Sex is risky. Until it isn’t, the best way to reduce risk is by proper and consistent condom usage. It’s a simple concept that easily improves everyone’s overall quality of life and reduces worry. There are many...

Link Between Oral Sex and Oral Cancer

It stands to reason that if the human papillomavirus (HPV) can cause cervical cancer, it could cause cancer in other parts of the body exposed to the virus. Researchers tested throat cancer patients for evidence of the virus and found it. The most direct way of becoming infected with HPV is through unprotected sex; in this case, unprotected oral sex is the problem. A Time article summarizes the findings published in the New England Journal of Medicine. The men and women study participants1 completed a survey about their sexual history and those with six or more oral sex partners were 32 times more likely to have throat cancer. The other two top risk factors, smoking and alcohol, don’t increase the risk factor by more than three. The risk of unprotected oral sex is increasing. The number of people in their 30s and 40s with throat cancer has noticeably risen over the past decade, according to a doctor interviewed in the Time article. This is brand-new research and needs further study, but I have little doubt that the original findings are correct. Although a lot of reaction is focusing on HPV’s effect on men, women are at as much risk as men. Infection is infection and unprotected oral sex is similarly risky whether a man or woman is giving it. Although there is speculation that the new HPV vaccine could prevent throat cancer (which kills about 3,000 people a year), it has not been tested. Although the HPV vaccine and the throat cancer study patients share one strain of HPV, this is no guarantee. Further study must be done. Of...

No More Periods

It is fairly common knowledge that one can continuously use active birth control pills in order to stop having periods (under the supervision of a gynecologist). Then Seasonale came along, which shortened the menstrual cycle down to four planned periods a year. Now a new pill, Lybrel, promises to do away with periods all together. It is safely being used in Europe and in clinical trials is as safe as regular birth control pills. But its FDA approval has been postponed, although the company is positive it will get approved within the next year. Read more in-depth info about the pill. And here’s an older, but more user-friendly article about the pill’s FDA trials. If you want to suspend your periods, for whatever reason, talk to your gynecologist. According to Allure October 2006 (p. 208), The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists reports that 53% of female ob-gyns use birth control pills to skip their own periods. For more information about skipping periods, you can visit noperiod.com and thewelltimedperiod...

If You Don’t Believe in Safer Sex (The Gum Game)

Through Ms. Naughty’s blog, I found an article about a unique method used to teach the risks of sex. (I’m not interested in the debate over using this method in high school classrooms.) My version of the game is simple and an excellent mental exercise. If you think safer sex guidelines are too inhibiting, try this: Mentally picture all of your clients and the escorts they’ve seen in a room with you. A random person puts a piece of gum in their mouth, chews it for a few seconds, then hands it the next person. Do you think your clients would be eager to share that piece of gum with each other? After it’s been around the room, would you put it in your mouth and chew it? If this grosses you out, then safer sex is for you. I cover a lot of guidelines in Book 1: The Foundation and have more references listed in the Resources. If this doesn’t bother you; recognize that this exercise, when done in a classroom, scared school administrators so badly they wanted to test the participating teenagers for various STDs, mono and other diseases. Just from a piece of gum. It wasn’t like the kids were asked to give uncovered blowjobs, swallow, or have unprotected...

3 Quick Tips on Medical Testing

This is a short, but important bit about three simple ways to protect your health when getting lab work/testing done. Speaking up or doing research is the best way you can ensure you receive quality health care. This information is from a sidebar article in some women’s magazine (I ripped out the page months ago but it has no publisher info on it). I’m repeating the information here. I don’t intend to plagiarize; if I could find this bit online I’d just link to it. When getting any test done, don’t assume the lab has your doctor’s stamp of approval – she may be sending it to the lab your insurance provider requires. Ask her if she feels the lab is reliable; if she doesn’t, consider having your test sent elsewhere – especially if she is concerned about a particular symptom or condition. To find out if a lab has had severe or repeated problems, go to http://www.cms.hhs.gov/clia/. To get the best breast ultrasound, use facilities accredited by the American College of Radiology (www.acr.org). Also ask your doctor if the practitioner who will read your ultrasound is trained in breast imaging. Actually, #3 good advice for any test – find out if the person examining your specimen or scan is experienced and reads that type of test regularly. Girls, bug your doctors with your questions. In modern American medicine, the squeaky wheel gets taken care...