The Internet Escort’s Handbook

Safe, Sane, Successful Escort Work is Possible!

Adult Industry Truth Survey

The Adult Industry Truth Survey is an attempt by two sex workers to shed light on what consent and coercion looks like from the perspective of sex workers. Serpent Libertine and Crysta Heart have come together with the help of DePaul University to create the first sex worker-run survey of sex work. This is an academically-reviewed study and they plan to publish the results in academic journals as well as mainstream media. The website — AdultIndustryTruth.com — is full of information about the survey, which runs through July 2014. The survey is open to anyone who works with sex in the US. The website and survey is engineered for anonymity and safety. Consent is the gap that separates sex work from sex trafficking (and something I’ve discussed in real life with others). Consent makes the difference to sex workers and their experiences; it should make the difference in policy but unfortunately, it currently does not. The AIT survey aims to help illustrate that difference. Follow the button below to take the survey, feel free to repost this information anywhere you can. The larger the results, the more accurate the information will be. You can follow AIT on Twitter or...

Desiree Alliance 2010 Abstracts

Presented at the 2010 Desiree Alliance Conference in Las Vegas Police Treatment of Arrested Sex Workers and the law Police are given the freedom to interpret and enforce prostitution laws as they see fit, which affects the daily lives of sex workers more than the actual laws themselves. In the partially-legal countries of England, Singapore and Hong Kong (technically not a country), and the fully-criminalized US, I will show that police treatment of arrested sex workers is not reflective of prostitution laws but instead reflects local police culture, effectiveness of police oversight and general local attitude toward sex workers themselves. The obvious solution to changing police treatment of arrested sex workers is more direct outreach and education with local police as well as actively engaging local police oversight resources, regardless of the actual laws regulating prostitution. Safety for Sex Workers through Personal Privacy: Digital and Real-World Techniques for Safeguarding Your Identity and Your Life Panel presentation with: Furry Girl, Brooke Magnanti, Alex Sotirov From pornographer/web model Furry Girl: As someone who’s a model and a small business owner, I’d like to point out the potential identity breaches rooted in the United State’s federal 2257 laws.  I’m not a lawyer – so my focus is explaining from an indie pornographer’s sex worker’s perspective how 2257 laws put everyone in a bad place and work to stifle free sexual expression online. From author and escort Amanda Brooks:  Offline privacy and money management.  I will offer simple, legal methods of disassociating your real name/home address from your work name.  It can also be important to keep your real name and actual place of residence separate from...

Safety for Sex Workers Through Personal Privacy

Legal and Relatively Simple Ways of Working and Living Out of Harm’s Way Presented at the 2008 Desiree Alliance Conference in Chicago This was a presentation from last year that many enjoyed and many others did not get to attend. New material will be added this year from my return to escort work — such as advance deposits without giving up my personal info. This is a straightforward how-to piece using legal techniques of misdirection and misinformation gleaned through my own experiences and research. The concepts of having an alternate name and an alternate mailing address are simple ideas. The trick is in learning how to achieve it. An untraceable cell phone, credit card and even business bank account is essential for sex workers with more complex business needs. None of these methods will hide you from the IRS or the government, but they are enough to keep predators at arms length, which is something most sex workers...

Know Your Rights!

A new administration, continuing crackdowns on CraigsList and sex workers watching their incomes fall leave many vulnerable who haven’t worried before. Just in time, SWOP-Chicago has released two videos for all sex workers who face the possibility of arrest on prostitution charges. It’s an excellent resource for all. I highly encourage anyone reading this blog to view the videos and learn. Know Your Rights Part I covers arrest — what to do and what not to do. Basically, you stand a much better chance of events turning in your favor if you stay silent. Know Your Rights Part II covers what happens after an arrest and spends significant time on walking you through your Emergency Response Worksheet step-by-step. These videos are valuable resources compiled not only by the actual collective experience of SWOP-Chicago, but anchored by their legal consultations as well. No rumors or urban legend allowed. Straight up, practical lessons on handling the event in the best possible way. Repeat viewings are...

Choosing a Domain Name — Extra Tip

In the section in Book 2 on purchasing domain names, I come up with some creative reasons for not buying your working name for your escort Web site. Another reason I should’ve mentioned: someone else might not like it. If you pick the name (or create a similar name) of a celebrity or fictional character, you could get a cease-and-desist letter from their estate or attorney. You run the risk of a defamation or copyright/trademark violation lawsuit as well. Or you could inadvertently choose the name of a real person, who discovers that an escort is using their name online. If they’re the wrong kind of person, they may well sue you for defamation. While I haven’t seen this happen yet, an escort I know shares the name of an author (who has made remarks on her blog). Though the escort has been using her working name for a few years, the author was born with that name and could make things ugly if she really wanted. This is simply something to be aware of when choosing a domain name. Some escorts get around this by purchasing domains like DateAmanda.com or AmandaofDallas.com instead of buying AmandaBrooks.com. Still not very creative, in my opinion, but less likely to make someone else...

When You DON’T Need a Site Disclaimer

Though I’ve discussed Web site disclaimers both here and in Book 2, the truth is your site may not require a disclaimer. If the site is simple and doesn’t allude to sexual activity (paid or unpaid), and your photos are unrevealing; an age limit and/or 2257 statement could be completely unnecessary. You might still want a Disclaimer page to make a copyright statement or to provide visitors the chance to leave if they’ve truly found your site by accident. But if you don’t have this extra page at the front of your site you should not be breaking any current stated Internet laws (I’m not a lawyer and this is not substitute for legal counsel). I have a Disclaimer on this site (though not the blog since it’s within the site’s structure) because I feel it’s proper. Though I doubt anyone has reached this site looking for information on anything other than safer sex or Internet escorts, I want to cover my bases. The topic is volatile enough. But a well-made escort site with nothing more than PG-rated content may not have to worry about making a disclaimer at...

Not Screening is Bad Advice

In discussing the Spitzer scandal, Mistress Matisse advises men seeking paid companionship to seek independents. I think that’s the correct route as well. But then she advises clients to seek independents who don’t screen, those who simply go on their instincts. She should know better. Every time I’ve heard of a girl getting arrested, it’s because she didn’t screen. No doubt girls who screen get arrested as well, but every instance I’ve come across doesn’t include screening. Girls who don’t screen are very easy pickings for police. Why should this concern a client? Girls who have been arrested and are still working are a risk. They could be under surveillance; they could be providing information for a reduced sentence. A client wanting to avoid risk does not want someone who is at high risk for having a history of arrest. And, of course, girls who don’t screen are easy targets for danger. This doesn’t pose much of a risk to clients, but it poses a huge risk to the girls themselves. It isn’t that screening prevents violence — it doesn’t. But it often gives a layer of protection: because the client is less likely to misbehave if he knows she has his personal, identifying information on her desk and someone with truly bad intentions probably isn’t willing to give out any information in the first place. Alternatives to Submitting Screening Info If you’re a client with the time to spare, meeting for coffee first is a great way to get around screening requirements (Matisse gives this tip as well). Of course, be willing to pay her rate for the...

Effects of Explicit Reviews

In Book #2, I discuss reviews, especially the explicit ones favored by The Erotic Review (TER) and some other review sites. While they can be a boon for business, they can also be used against you as evidence to make a case for arrest (this has happened). If they are used against you as evidence, chances are they’ll be read in court, which could be embarrassing for most girls. Yesterday, a whole new level of possible embarrassment opened up – getting your reviews read on Howard Stern. Apparently Kristen (of the Spitzer scandal) had TER reviews under another name. Howard got that information and read her reviews – the non-public part. He has an audience of over12 million. I’m not saying to not allow reviews, though that is the path of most discretion. I am saying to think about your review choices. There are very explicit review sites and escort-friendly review sites. If you think you might be embarrassed or incriminated by very explicit reviews, then you may want to limit the sites where your reviews appear. Clients are usually willing to honor your politely-worded...